Date of Presentation

5-5-2022 12:00 AM

College

School of Osteopathic Medicine

Poster Abstract

A teratoma is a mass that originates from the germ cells of the three primitive embryonic layers and commonly arises from the ovaries or testicles, thereby characterized as gonadal in origin. These masses comprise different types of tissues such as fat, hair, muscle, and bone. Extragonadal teratomas are uncommon and arise from anatomical locations other than the gonads, such as the pineal gland, anterior mediastinum, retroperitoneum, and sacrococcygeal regions. The most common is the presacral region, as it contains tissue derived from all germ layers. Tumors in this specific location are far more common in neonates, infants, and children rather than adults, and females rather than males. The patient in this case, an adult male, was found to have a sacrococcygeal teratoma, making this case exceptionally unique. The teratoma was appropriately excised, and done so laparoscopically, an approach with little published literature regarding these specific tumors. Given the exceedingly rare nature of sacrococcygeal teratomas in adults, especially males, there is little literature on the subject in regard to management.

Keywords

Teratoma, Male, Neoplasms

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences | Neoplasms | Surgery

Document Type

Poster

COinS
 
May 5th, 12:00 AM

Extragonadal Perirectal Mature Cystic Teratoma in the Adult Male

A teratoma is a mass that originates from the germ cells of the three primitive embryonic layers and commonly arises from the ovaries or testicles, thereby characterized as gonadal in origin. These masses comprise different types of tissues such as fat, hair, muscle, and bone. Extragonadal teratomas are uncommon and arise from anatomical locations other than the gonads, such as the pineal gland, anterior mediastinum, retroperitoneum, and sacrococcygeal regions. The most common is the presacral region, as it contains tissue derived from all germ layers. Tumors in this specific location are far more common in neonates, infants, and children rather than adults, and females rather than males. The patient in this case, an adult male, was found to have a sacrococcygeal teratoma, making this case exceptionally unique. The teratoma was appropriately excised, and done so laparoscopically, an approach with little published literature regarding these specific tumors. Given the exceedingly rare nature of sacrococcygeal teratomas in adults, especially males, there is little literature on the subject in regard to management.

 

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