Author(s)

Jennifer Murkli

Date Approved

8-1-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. School Psychology-Professional School Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

Preschool children;Parenting

Disciplines

Child Psychology | Student Counseling and Personnel Services

Abstract

The present study examined the relationship between parent involvement and parent efficacy in parents of preschool children. Twenty parents from a suburban, a predominantly White private preschool participated in the study. Parent self-reports of involvement and efficacy beliefs as they pertain to their preschooler's learning and development were assessed. On average, parents reported medium parent efficacy and medium parent involvement. Results of the study demonstrated a significant relationship between parent involvement and parent efficacy. The relationship was moderate with a positive direction. Thus, the relationship demonstrated to a modest degree that greater parent efficacy is related to greater parent involvement, and vice versa. The study expands upon previous research in early childhood and supports the evidence that parent efficacy is associated with parent involvement in a small sample. Thus, the preschool administration specific to this study should focus on programs and strategies to increase both parent efficacy and parent involvement.

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